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HOW YOUR GUT EFFECTS YOUR HEART?

adrenal fatigue adult abuse connection between the gut and heart gut heart leaky gut Feb 05, 2022
gut and heart health

“Maybe the old saying is true: the road to a man's heart is through his stomach.”

In the United States, heart disease remains the major cause of death. So, it's not surprising that almost everyone knows someone who has been affected. Heart disease has serious consequences that can catch families off guard.

To counter this, we've been taught from a young age to eat healthily and exercise often to maintain a strong and healthy heart. Cereal boxes are imprinted with "heart-healthy" stamps of approval and claims to lower cholesterol. Schools have even launched campaigns to teach students the importance of heart health.

Despite widespread education and major breakthroughs in modern medicine, the number of individuals diagnosed with heart disease has increased over the last decade, and statistics continue to rise.

It raises another question. Is eating 'healthy' and exercising enough to keep your heart healthy?

CONNECTION BETWEEN THE GUT AND HEART

The evidence appears to suggest that there is a missing element to this equation, and a new study points to the gut microbiome.

Could there be a day when a urine test, tongue swab, or breath test for a specific bacterium or metabolite could identify your risk of heart disease with surety? Some scholars feel that this is a possibility that is closer than we believe.

This also indicates that you should not ignore stomach issues too fast. A little gas and bloating here and there may not seem like a huge concern, but if left untreated (or worse, covered up with over-the-counter drugs), it can lead to more serious problems down the line.

HOW DOES THE LEAKY GUT CAUSE HEART DISEASE?

At first, bacteria that should only be present in the colon might move to the small intestine and create issues. Second, when some bacteria are exposed to high levels of protein diet, they can produce toxic byproducts, some of which are linked to heart disease. Third, when especially harmful bacteria enter the bloodstream through the gut lining, they can cause widespread systemic inflammation.

ROLE OF GUT MICROBIOME

Your microbiome is made up of trillions of microorganisms that live in and on your body, most of which are bacteria, but there are also fungi and other organisms. The average person's microbiome contains around 38 trillion bacteria, with the majority of these creatures residing in the digestive system, or gut.

Many of these bacteria are assumed to be good, helping in the regular processes of your digestive system and helping in the protection of your body against more dangerous pathogens.

Other bacteria in your microbiome, on the other hand, can not only upset your gut health but also have a negative impact on many other regions of your body.

Raphael Kellman, MD, an integrative and functional medicine physician and the founder of the Kellman Wellness Centre in New York City, states,

"There is substantial evidence that the gut microbiome has a role in human health in almost all disorders."

While there is still much to understand about how the gut microbiota influences various disease risks, it is evident that an unhealthy gut generates poor health effects via inflammation - your immune system's response to an injury or foreign substance.

GUT MICROBIOME AND HEART DISEASE

A study that was just released last month found that dietary patterns influence the gut microbiome, which then influences markers of chronic diseases—including heart disease!

We have to look at the details to know how this applies to everyday life, so let’s do that. Here’s what the study found:

  • Diets rich in healthy, plant-based foods encouraged the growth of healthy bacteria in the gut
  • A microbiome rich in Prevotella copri and Blastocystis was associated with better blood sugar levels after meals
  • Other species were linked to lower levels of blood fats and markers of inflammation after meals
  • The microbiome had a stronger link to disease markers related to metabolism and heart health than other factors (like genetics)

Remember this: every time you eat, you’re not just sustaining your energy. You’re feeding the trillions of bacteria that live synergistically with you in your gut.

And that, my friend, could have effects that extend to things like blood sugar, inflammation, and a healthy heart.

  • Give a list of ways to support a healthy microbiome (specific foods, probiotics, exercise, etc.)
  • Explain the various ways the microbiome affects overall health (heart health, brain health, etc.)
  • Do an overview of a functional approach to gut health
  • How your gut affects your heart
  • Surprising effect of the gut microbiome
  • One more way to protect your heart

If you’d like to know more; 

Read my bestselling books on drameet.com/books, start your online course on drameet.com/course or book an appointments via drameet.com/therapy to heal from depression, anxiety, weight, inflammation, hormones, fatigue, libido, gut health, liver toxicity, adrenal fatigue and emotional pain. 

Get well soon! 

 

 KEYWORDS

  • CONNECTION BETWEEN THE GUT AND HEART
  • HOW DOES THE LEAKY GUT CAUSE HEART DISEASE?
  • GUT MICROBIOME AND HEART DISEASE
  • ROLE OF GUT MICROBIOME

 

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